draw, draws, drawn, drew, drawer, drawers – withdraw – drawls

One of my favourite examples of a word with an awful lot of meaning wrapped into four letters:

Draw.

It seems simple enough. As in when we draw a picture right?

Let’s think about it. This meaning of the word seems to stem more broadly from to draw, as in to draw out. Say when we go to the nurse and she takes some blood, she will draw it out, or more simple put, draw some blood. To draw, in this sense, suggests something that comes out, perhaps painfully, or even carefully. If one has ever tried to draw, as in art, one can well sense why it is such an appropriate word.

However draw can also refer to something that goes in. That is to draw in, or draw near. To draw, in this sense, means something along the lines of a pull, or an invisible force. So we could say I was drawn by the wondrous light display, or while I was swimming at the beach the rip drew me under.

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Which one swooped? Fowl, foul or fell?

A fowl swoop seems only natural, but surely we mean a foul one?

Fowl

A FOWL is a bird, like a pheasant, a chicken or a duck.

One tends to picture a Nineteenth Century English countryside with English gentlemen blasting the skies with their shotguns, hounds yapping at their heels eager to collect dead birds; That or fond memories of childhood. See Danny the Champion of the World.

They are not a swooping bird so much as a bird that gets swatted at.

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Moot or Mute point? A Mote’s Point.

When something doesn’t amount to much. We have a word for that.

A mute is someone who doesn’t speak, they are mute on the matter, indeed they are mute on every matter.

I mute the television when the ads come on. Likewise, a mute might also mute the television if the phone rang and they wanted to hear what the other person was saying, though in no way could they respond – making their answering the phone somewhat moot.

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Mentee, Mentoree, Meant what?

Language use is a living contest for the expression of ideas. One such contest follows, but who will prevail?

[dropcap]A[/dropcap] friend of mine recently disparagingly commented on a mentoring program for their use of the word “mentee”.

To quote: “You’d think a mentoring program would know there’s no such word.”

For those of you thinking I’m being needlessly fastidious and that I’m going to say the word ought to be mentoree, you’d be wrong, as mentoree is not a word either. Continue reading “Mentee, Mentoree, Meant what?”